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Original Article

September 21, 2022


Risk of dementia according to the severity of chronic periodontitis in Korea: a nationwide retrospective cohort study
Seon-Rye Kim, Minkook Son, Yu-Rin Kim, Hyun-Kyung Kang
Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022077.

Original Article

September 7, 2022


The associations of job strain and leisure-time physical activity with the risk of hypertension: the population-based Midlife in the United States cohort study
Xinyue Liu, Timothy A. Matthews, Liwei Chen, Jian Li
Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022073.

Data Profile

September 7, 2022


Integrated dataset of the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study cohort with estimated air pollution data
Hae Dong Woo, Dae Sub Song, Sun Ho Choi, Jae Kyung Park, Kyoungho Lee, Hui-Young Yun, Dae-Ryun Choi, Youn-Seo Koo, Hyun-Young Park
Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022071.

Systematic Review

September 1, 2022


Systematic review and meta-analysis of cancer risks in relation to environmental waste incinerator emissions: a meta-analysis of case-control and cohort studies
Kiook Baek, Jong-Tae Park, Kyeongmin Kwak
Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022070.

Original Article

August 16, 2022


Trends and disparities in avoidable, treatable, and preventable mortalities in South Korea, 2001-2020: comparison of capital and non-capital areas
Sang Jun Eun
Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022067.

Current Issue
Volume 44; 2022
Original Article Risk of dementia according to the severity of chronic periodontitis in Korea: a nationwide retrospective cohort study
Seon-Rye Kim, Minkook Son, Yu-Rin Kim, Hyun-Kyung Kang Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022077.
  • Abstract
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  • Korean summary
  • Supplementary data
Original Article The associations of job strain and leisure-time physical activity with the risk of hypertension: the population-based Midlife in the United States cohort study
Xinyue Liu, Timothy A. Matthews, Liwei Chen, Jian Li Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022073.
  • Abstract
  • View article
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:
We investigated the risk of dementia in older adults with chronic periodontitis according to the severity of periodontitis.
METHODS:
Data on patients with chronic periodontitis were extracted from the National Health Insurance Service-Senior cohort database from 2002 to 2014. Among 52,728 subjects eligible for inclusion, 11,953 subjects had newly diagnosed mild chronic periodontitis (MCP), and 40,775 subjects had newly diagnosed severe chronic periodontitis (SCP). Two 1:1 propensity score matched cohorts were created with 8,624 patients each in the MCP and SCP groups. To analyze the risk of dementia, a Cox proportional-hazard model was used to calculate hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
RESULTS:
In the Kaplan-Meier curve, the disease-free probability was significantly lower in the SCP group than in the MCP group (p for log-rank=0.001). In the multivariable-adjusted model, the HR for the occurrence of dementia in the SCP group compared to the MCP group was 1.15 (95% CI, 1.04 to 1.27; p=0.009). A subgroup analysis revealed a significant association between dementia and the severity of periodontitis, especially in subjects who were male, aged ≥70 years, and had comorbidities.
CONCLUSIONS:
Reducing the severity of chronic periodontitis can help to reduce the risk of dementia. Therefore, it is necessary to aggressively conduct early dementia-prevention programs for males under the age of 70 that include dental health to prevent the progression of periodontitis from mild to severe.
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:
Job strain is positively associated with incident hypertension, while increasing leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) can reduce incident hypertension. However, the joint associations of job strain and LTPA with incident hypertension among United States workers have yet to be investigated. This study examined the independent and joint associations of job strain and LTPA with incident hypertension.
METHODS:
This prospective cohort study (n=1,160) utilized data from the population-based Midlife in the United States study. The associations of job strain and LTPA at baseline with incident hypertension during follow-up were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. High job strain was derived from a combination of high job demands and low job control, and high LTPA was defined as engagement in moderate or vigorous LTPA at least once per week.
RESULTS:
During 9,218 person-years of follow-up, the hypertension incidence rate was 30.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 27.3 to 34.3) per 1,000 person-years. High job strain was associated with a higher risk for hypertension than low job strain (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.29; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.67). High LTPA was associated with lower hypertension risk than low LTPA (aHR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.98). Hypertension risk was higher among workers with high job strain and low LTPA than among those with low job strain and high LTPA (aHR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.18 to 2.43).
CONCLUSIONS:
Job strain and LTPA showed positive and inverse associations, respectively, with incident hypertension. The combination of high job strain and low LTPA was associated with the highest risk for hypertension.
Data Profile Integrated dataset of the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study cohort with estimated air pollution data
Hae Dong Woo, Dae Sub Song, Sun Ho Choi, Jae Kyung Park, et al. Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022071.
  • Abstract
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  • Korean summary
Systematic Review Systematic review and meta-analysis of cancer risks in relation to environmental waste incinerator emissions: a meta-analysis of case-control and cohort studies
Kiook Baek, Jong-Tae Park, Kyeongmin Kwak Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022070.
  • Abstract
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  • Korean summary
Abstract
Public concern about the adverse health effects of air pollution has grown rapidly in Korea, and there has been increasing demand for research on ways to minimize the health effects of air pollution. Integrating large epidemiological data and air pollution exposure levels can provide a data infrastructure for studying ambient air pollution and its health effects. The Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES), a large population-based study, has been used in many epidemiological studies of chronic diseases. Therefore, KoGES cohort data were linked to air pollution data as a national resource for air pollution studies. Air pollution data were produced using community multiscale air quality modeling with additional adjustment of monitoring data, satellite-derived aerosol optical depth, normalized difference vegetation index, and meteorological data to increase the accuracy and spatial resolution. The modeled air pollution data were linked to the KoGES cohort based on participants’ geocoded residential addresses in grids of 1 km (particulate matter) or 9 km (gaseous air pollutants and meteorological variables). As the integrated data become available to all researchers, this resource is expected to serve as a useful infrastructure for research on the health effects of air pollution.
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:
Various toxic substances can be generated from incinerators, exposing nearby residents, and epidemiological studies have shown wide variations in risk estimates for cancer risk in populations living close to incinerators.
METHODS:
Following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, a literature search and systematic review were conducted to identify studies conducted on general populations exposed to environmental incinerator emissions and cancer outcomes. Meta-analysis was performed according to the cancer types for which 2 or more studies were reported. Subgroup analysis was done for sex, the exposure estimation method, the study period, and the type of outcome.
RESULTS:
Eleven studies were found for the qualitative review and meta-analysis. Seven studies had a case-control design, and 4 had a cohort design. The pooled effect size was not significant for breast, colorectal, liver, lung, lymphohematopoietic, stomach, bladder, central nervous system, and laryngeal cancers, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, sarcoma, leukemia, and all cancers. In the subgroup analysis, the pooled effect size of laryngeal cancer in females was 1.82 (95% confidence interval, 1.10 to 3.01), although only 2 studies were identified.
CONCLUSIONS:
The meta-analysis did not provide evidence of an increased risk for any cancer among populations living near waste incinerators, except for laryngeal cancer in females. However, since relatively few studies were reviewed and some cancer types showed significant increases in individual studies, this evidence needs to be updated regularly.
Original Article Trends and disparities in avoidable, treatable, and preventable mortalities in South Korea, 2001-2020: comparison of capital and non-capital areas
Sang Jun Eun Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022067.
  • Abstract
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  • Korean summary
COVID-19: Epidemiologic Investigation Analysis of the on-ship transmission of the COVID-19 mass outbreak on the Republic of Korea Navy amphibious warfare ship
Soo Hyeon Cho, Young-Man Kim, Gyeongyong Seong, Sunkyun Park, et al. Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022065.
  • Abstract
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  • Supplementary data
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:
This study aimed to describe the regional avoidable mortality trends in Korea and examine the trends in avoidable mortality disparities between the Seoul Capital Area and non-Seoul-Capital areas, thereby exploring the underlying reasons for the trend changes.
METHODS:
Age-standardized mortality rates from avoidable causes between 2001-2020 were calculated by region. Regional disparities in avoidable mortality were quantified on both absolute and relative scales. Trends and disparities in avoidable mortality were analyzed using joinpoint regression models.
RESULTS:
Avoidable, treatable, and preventable mortalities in Korea decreased at different rates over time by region. The largest decreases were in the non-Seoul-Capital non-metropolitan area for avoidable and preventable mortality rates and the non-Seoul- Capital metropolitan area for treatable mortality rates, despite the largest decline being in the Seoul Capital Area prior to around 2009. Absolute and relative regional disparities in avoidable and preventable mortalities generally decreased. Relative disparities in treatable mortality between areas widened. Regional disparities in all types of mortalities tended to improve after around 2009, especially among males. In females, disparities in avoidable, treatable, and preventable mortalities between areas improved less or even worsened.
CONCLUSIONS:
Trends and disparities in avoidable mortality across areas in Korea seem to have varied under the influence of diverse social changes. Enhancing health services to underserved areas and strengthening gender-oriented policies are needed to reduce regional disparities in avoidable mortality.
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:
This investigation was conducted to determine the size and pattern, source, and transmission route of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak on the Republic of Korea Navy (ROKN) amphibious warfare ship.
METHODS:
We investigated the characteristics of all crew members and tracked the medical records of the confirmed cases. Fourteen essential ship operation personnel were interviewed. The study design was a retrospective cohort study, and the incidence rate ratio was through a statistical program.
RESULTS:
The COVID-19 incidence on the ROKN amphibious warfare ship was 44.7% (38/85). It was estimated that the main propagation route started from the 1st floor worker, which spread to the same floor, and then to other floors. In the case of the working area, the incidence rate of crew members below the 1st floor without ventilation was higher than those on the 2nd or higher floors with natural ventilation.
CONCLUSIONS:
This case is the first case of a COVID-19 outbreak on the ROKN amphibious warfare ship, and it is estimated that the incidence rate is high because of the closed and dense environment. To prevent the spread of various respiratory diseases including COVID-19, unified mitigation such as vaccination, observing personal quarantine rules, periodic ventilation, preemptive testing, and blocking transmission through prompt contact management is necessary.

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